About Us

The Gallatin Valley Soil and Water Conservation District was formed on June 8, 1949. Supervisors were: Harold Klumph, Tom Gowin, Stuart Westlake, Delmar Moore, and John Pasha. Art Shaw, County Extension, acted as Secretary.

On January 17, 1968, the Three Rivers Soil and Water Conservation District (formed on June 20, 1944) merged with the Gallatin Valley Soil and Water Conservation District.  The Three Rivers District was dissolved at that time.

In July of 1971, the District name was changed to Gallatin Conservation District. Supervisors at the time were: Henry VanHoorn, John Buttleman, John Schutter Sr., M.J. Long, and Norman Torgerson.

The Gallatin Conservation District (GCD) is one of 58 Conservation Districts in Montana. The GCD is a subdivision of state government and receives the majority of funds through a county tax assessment on real property.  A landowner with property valued at $100,000 can expect to pay approximately $1.00 a year in tax to the GCD. A non-paid elected board of five supervisors and two appointed urban supervisors governs district business. The GCD also appoints Associate Supervisors who serve as advisories to the board. The GCD covers all portions of the county except the major portions of the cities of Belgrade and Bozeman. Click here for Bozeman map. Click here for Belgrade map.  

Your local Conservation District administers the Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act, provides youth and adult education opportunities, sponsors grants, provides assistance to small acreage landowners, conducts a cost share program for landowners, provides items for sale, partners with other agencies on natural resource based projects, and gets actively involved in various programs and events.

The GCD conducts all of its business at public meetings and the public is encourage to attend and to get involved with community activities. Meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month. View the calendar for specific times. For questions or comments, please email: info@gallatincd.org.

Photo courtesy of NRCS